The Grip - Setup and Types

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The Grip - Setup and Types

Post  MoneyShot on Fri Dec 21, 2007 3:45 pm

Introduction

Stand still with your arms hanging by your side. Now fit a club into your left hand so its sits comfortably. Extend your right hand out as if about to shake hands with someone and then place it on the handle below your left hand. Relax your elbows and shoulders but be firm in your hands but not tight. The tighter your grip, the more likely it is your swing will breakdown along the way if you change the pressure on the club.

Here's how to use your top hand:

First thing to do is let your arms hang naturally. Place your palms on either side of the grip so they are facing each other. Keep your hands relaxed, especially when attempting to hit the ball a long way. Top players grip the club lightly in their fingers rather than their palms.

Step 1:

Lay the grip of the club diagonally across the palm of the top hand, your left hand if you are playing right handed. The grip should be nestled in the crease where the fingers meet the palm. The back of the hand should be facing the target. Many players extend their index finger down the grip slightly.

Step 2:

Close your fingers around the grip. Feel the end of the club resting against the fleshy pad in the palm of your hand. Curl your forefinger last.

Step 3:

You should be able to see two or three knuckles on the back of your left hand. Your thumb should extend straight down the grip but slightly to the left of centre. The tips of your fingers should just touch the base of the other palm. If they don't meet, your club's grip may be too wide for you, and vice versa.

Here's how to use set up your bottom hand:

With your arms hanging naturally, your palms should be either side of the grip facing each other. And remember not to be too tense with your grip.

Step 1:

Bring your right hand onto the club. The palm should face the target.

Step 2:

Close your fingers around the grip. As you lock your hands into place, your forefinger should cock up slightly to form a 'trigger', rather than wrapping all the way round the club like your other fingers.

Step 3:

The V-formed by the thumb and forefinger on your right hand should point up to your right shoulder. As you look down you should be able to see two knuckles on each hand. You are now ready to hit that ball.

Overlapping Grip

This is the grip most commonly used by golfers. It is called this because the little finger of the right hand slots into the groove formed by the first two fingers of the left hand. It provides a flexible yet firm connection between the two hands to ensure they act in harmony. It is also known as the Vardon grip - after Harry Vardon - the famous English golfer who introduced it at the end of the 19th century. Ernie Els is one of the many Tour players who holds the club like this.

Interlocking Grip

This is the grip favoured by golfers with small hands. This is the interlocking grip and is the one used by Tiger Woods. The little finger rests in between the index and the middle finger as with the overlapping grip. But this time the index finger pops out.

Baseball Grip

This is a good way for beginners to start as it means your hands have freedom of movement. The hands are placed on the club side by side with no link. This was the way all golfers used to hold the club, but the game has developed hugely over the last hundred years. Now it is quite rare among top players as other grips have developed which provide more control. Ronan Rafferty is one of the few modern day pros using it.
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MoneyShot

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